The Warrior Heir – Review

The Warrior Heir by Cinda Williams Chima
Book 1 in The Heir Chronicles
Genre: YA fantasy
Pages: 426
Format: hardback, library

twh

I loved Cinda’s other series, The Demon King, so I was excited to start The Warrior Heir. But, to be honest, it was a letdown. So, at 46% through (page 197), I DNF’d it. It’s the second book in a row I haven’t finished, but I just couldn’t get into it. I tried and I couldn’t. 😦

the plot

The synopsis sounded awesome, but the execution unfortunately didn’t live up to it. It felt overdone and unoriginal. Jack had no idea he had magic or was part of this other world, and then after a short amount of training he went from average to strong and muscular. It felt like magic and fighting was a steroid of sorts, and I’m just not into that sort of thing. However, I did like the basis of the guilds. Their origin story was great and unique, and I liked the concept of the White and Red Roses too. But the execution of both fell short, and in my opinion the Game felt a bit too much like The Hunger Games, just with magic. 😦

the characters

Jack was an okay lead, but I couldn’t find anything special about him. He was an average high school guy. I figure that’s the point, that his power is what makes him extraordinary, but I don’t believe that and I feel like everyone should have some sort of unique trait or quality. I did like that he played soccer, though. I’m not athletic myself, but I’m glad it wasn’t something else overly common, like football. πŸ™‚

I didn’t really like the side characters either. It felt too convenient that Jack’s mom Becka was so busy with work and didn’t notice much. Will and Fitch didn’t stand out, and Leesha and Lobeck seemed stereotypical. I did like Ellen though. She doesn’t have a big role in the story but she was just oddly appealing to me, and I thought her stunt with Leesha was amusing. πŸ˜›

the setting

This book takes place in Trinity, Ohio, a small, off-the-charts town that seemed to be sparsely populated. It was one of those everyone-knows-everyone towns, and there wasn’t anything remarkable about it. But that was the whole point, because Jack needed to be a secret, which again, isn’t very original. 😦

the relationships

With Jack’s mom working and his aunt leaving, there wasn’t much of a familial relationship in this book, but there was a nice friendship between Jack, Will, and Fitch. However, since Jack can’t tell them about his other life, I’m not sure if they’ll last. I hope they do, because even if I didn’t really like him, Jack does deserve a bit of normalcy. πŸ™‚

the twists

Up to the point I stopped at, nothing big had happened. Like with The Raven Boys, I assume there’s a big twist towards the end, but I had hoped for more small surprises to pop up throughout the story. Without them, it was a lot of information and training, which unfortunately wasn’t entertaining for me. I know some is necessary for the story and character’s development, but here it felt like a little bit too much.

overall

I wanted to get through this and like it as much as I did The Demon King, but I just couldn’t. The plot was slow and not entirely original and the only character I really liked was Ellen. I think the concepts were great but Cinda’s execution fell somewhat short. The Warrior Heir isn’t for me. 😦

my rating: 1ΒΎ out of 5 stars


Note: IΒ wasn’t trying to be harsh in any way, and I would still recommend this book if you haven’t read it. You might like it. πŸ™‚

Have you read this book? Is it on your TBR? If you have read it, what did you think? I’d love to know!Β πŸ™‚

I’ll be reading The Iron King by Julie Kagawa next. Hopefully it’ll break my DNF chain! πŸ˜‰

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2 thoughts on “The Warrior Heir – Review

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